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A rat is a pig is a dog is a boy : the human cost of the animal rights movement / Wesley J. Smith.

By: Smith, Wesley J.
Publisher: New York, NY : Encounter Books, c2012Edition: 1st pbk. ed.Description: xix, 314 p. ; 23 cm.ISBN: 9781594036149 (pbk.) :; 1594036144 (pbk.) :.Other title: Human cost of the animal rights movement.Subject(s): Animal rights | Human-animal relationships | Animal welfare
Contents:
Foreword / by Dean Koontz --Preface to the paperback edition -- Introduction -- Part I: For The Animals -- Chapter 1: Animal advocacy isn't what it used to be -- Chapter 2: All animals are equal -- Chapter 3: Animals are people too -- Chapter 4: Let it begin with apes -- Chapter 5: Here comes the judge -- Chapter 6: Silver Spring monkey case -- Chapter 7: Death of a thousand cuts -- Chapter 8: Proselytizing children -- Part 2: By Any Means Necessary -- Chapter 9: Advocating terror -- Chapter 10: Tertiary targeting -- Chapter 11: Praising with faint condemnation -- Chapter 12: Murder they wrote? -- Part 3: For The People -- Chapter 13: Animal rights vs. medical research -- Chapter 14: Our system of animal research -- Chapter 15: Ensuring the proper care of lab animals -- Chapter 16: Meat is not murder -- Chapter 17: Fur, hunting, and zoos -- Chapter 18: Importance of being human -- Supplement -- Acknowledgments -- Notes --Index.
Summary: Overview: In A Rat is a Pig is a Dog is a Boy, Wesley Smith explains how, over the past thirty years, the concept of "animal rights" has undergone literal and extreme interpretations in Western culture. Although there are activists who seek better treatment of animals through welfare work, there are also those who see "animal rights" as a belief system, an ideology, and for some even a quasi-religion that both implicitly and explicitly seeks to create a moral equivalency between the value of human lives and those of animals. Smith explains how animal rights ideologues embrace their beliefs with a fervency that is remarkably intense and sustained, to the point that some dedicate their entire lives to "speaking for those who cannot speak for themselves." Some believe their cause to be so righteous that they engage in vandalism, harassment, or even terrorism at the expense of medical research, the clothing and food industries, and others accused of "animal abuse." For those of us who respect and appreciate animals, but who also understand that our obligation to humanity matters more, A Rat is a Pig is a Dog is a Boy is an important case against an increasingly radical dogma.
Holdings
Item type Current library Home library Shelving location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Books Books American University in Dubai American University in Dubai Main Collection HV 4708 .S623 2012 (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Available 5086346

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Foreword / by Dean Koontz --Preface to the paperback edition -- Introduction -- Part I: For The Animals -- Chapter 1: Animal advocacy isn't what it used to be -- Chapter 2: All animals are equal -- Chapter 3: Animals are people too -- Chapter 4: Let it begin with apes -- Chapter 5: Here comes the judge -- Chapter 6: Silver Spring monkey case -- Chapter 7: Death of a thousand cuts -- Chapter 8: Proselytizing children -- Part 2: By Any Means Necessary -- Chapter 9: Advocating terror -- Chapter 10: Tertiary targeting -- Chapter 11: Praising with faint condemnation -- Chapter 12: Murder they wrote? -- Part 3: For The People -- Chapter 13: Animal rights vs. medical research -- Chapter 14: Our system of animal research -- Chapter 15: Ensuring the proper care of lab animals -- Chapter 16: Meat is not murder -- Chapter 17: Fur, hunting, and zoos -- Chapter 18: Importance of being human -- Supplement -- Acknowledgments -- Notes --Index.

Overview: In A Rat is a Pig is a Dog is a Boy, Wesley Smith explains how, over the past thirty years, the concept of "animal rights" has undergone literal and extreme interpretations in Western culture. Although there are activists who seek better treatment of animals through welfare work, there are also those who see "animal rights" as a belief system, an ideology, and for some even a quasi-religion that both implicitly and explicitly seeks to create a moral equivalency between the value of human lives and those of animals. Smith explains how animal rights ideologues embrace their beliefs with a fervency that is remarkably intense and sustained, to the point that some dedicate their entire lives to "speaking for those who cannot speak for themselves." Some believe their cause to be so righteous that they engage in vandalism, harassment, or even terrorism at the expense of medical research, the clothing and food industries, and others accused of "animal abuse." For those of us who respect and appreciate animals, but who also understand that our obligation to humanity matters more, A Rat is a Pig is a Dog is a Boy is an important case against an increasingly radical dogma.

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