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Here comes everybody : the power of organizing without organizations / Clay Shirky.

By: Shirky, Clay.
Publisher: New York : Penguin Press, 2008Description: 344 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781594201530; 9780143114949.Subject(s): Information technology -- Social aspects | Computer networks -- Social aspects | Internet -- Social aspects | Online social networks | Community power | Power (Social sciences) | Social Behavior | Technology | Internet | Telecommunications | Social Change | Community power | Computer networks -- Social aspects | Information technology -- Social aspects | Internet -- Social aspects | Online social networks | Power (Social sciences) | ICT | Internet | Sociale aspecten | Sociale netwerken
Contents:
It takes a village to find a phone -- Sharing anchors community -- Everyone is a media outlet -- Publish, then filter -- Personal motivation meets collaborative production -- Collective action and institutional challenges -- Faster and faster -- Solving social dilemmas -- Fitting our tools to a small world -- Failure for free -- Promise, tool, bargain -- Epilogue. Revolution doesn't happen when society adopts new technology, it happens when society adopts new behaviors
Summary: An examination of how the rapid spread of new forms of social interaction enabled by technology is changing the way humans form groups and exist within them, with profound long-term economic and social effects--for good and for ill. Our age's new technologies of social networking are evolving, and evolving us, into new groups doing new things in new ways, and old and new groups alike doing the old things better and more easily. Hierarchical structures that exist to manage the work of groups are seeing their raisons d'e^tre swiftly eroded by the rising tide. Business models are being destroyed, transformed, born at dizzying speeds, and the larger social impact is profound. Clay Shirky is one of our wisest observers of the transformational power of the new forms of tech-enabled social interaction, and this is his reckoning with the ramifications of all this on what we do and who we are.--From publisher description.Summary: Discusses and uses examples of how digital networks transform the ability of humans to gather and cooperate with one another.
List(s) this item appears in: Faculty TextBook
Holdings
Item type Current library Home library Shelving location Call number Status Notes Date due Barcode
Books Books American University in Dubai American University in Dubai Main Collection HM851.S5465 2008 C1 (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Available Paper Back 5123797
Books Books American University in Dubai American University in Dubai Main Collection HM851 .S5465 2008 C2 (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Available Hard Cover 600501

Includes bibliographical references (pages 325-336) and index.

It takes a village to find a phone -- Sharing anchors community -- Everyone is a media outlet -- Publish, then filter -- Personal motivation meets collaborative production -- Collective action and institutional challenges -- Faster and faster -- Solving social dilemmas -- Fitting our tools to a small world -- Failure for free -- Promise, tool, bargain -- Epilogue. Revolution doesn't happen when society adopts new technology, it happens when society adopts new behaviors

An examination of how the rapid spread of new forms of social interaction enabled by technology is changing the way humans form groups and exist within them, with profound long-term economic and social effects--for good and for ill. Our age's new technologies of social networking are evolving, and evolving us, into new groups doing new things in new ways, and old and new groups alike doing the old things better and more easily. Hierarchical structures that exist to manage the work of groups are seeing their raisons d'e^tre swiftly eroded by the rising tide. Business models are being destroyed, transformed, born at dizzying speeds, and the larger social impact is profound. Clay Shirky is one of our wisest observers of the transformational power of the new forms of tech-enabled social interaction, and this is his reckoning with the ramifications of all this on what we do and who we are.--From publisher description.

Discusses and uses examples of how digital networks transform the ability of humans to gather and cooperate with one another.

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